~By Rose Colleran~   Summer is, hands down, my favorite time of year. I love it when it’s not dark when I head out for a run at 5:30AM and I’m not wearing gloves and a hat. I love the reduction of chaos and driving around from one activity to the next. I love spending time having fun with friends and family. I truthfully think I go into a seasonal depression when the days start to get shorter and school starts again. There is one thing, however, that I find challenging about the summer. When the weather is fabulous and the days are long, everybody loves a barbecue. You round up family and friends, fire up the grill, serve up some cervezas, and feast. If you’re trying to, at the very least, maintain your weight, let alone lose any weight or adhere to healthy eating habits, these kinds of gluttonous food spreads can actually induce stress rather than the feeling of enjoyment that was the original goal. I find summer to be just as challenging to maintain my weight and my healthy eating goals as the holidays. The holidays are approximately six weeks long, while summer vacation can be closer to ten weeks. So, what...

~Written by Rose Colleran~   I’m sure you may be thinking “I have no idea what a locavore is!” Locavore was the New Oxford American Dictionary’s Word of the Year in 2007. This new word was coined by a small group of women from San Francisco in 2005 and is used to describe the philosophy of only eating foods grown or produced within a 100-mile radius of your home.   Locavores hope that by eating what is in-season in their geographic area they will boost their local economy (by supporting the farmers in their community) and reduce their carbon footprint on the environment (by reducing the fuel used to transport food long distances). They believe locally grown produce is better for you as most small, community farmers use fewer chemical fertilizers and pesticides. They also believe that local farms utilize more natural or organic farming methods which help to reduce air, soil and water pollution. This way of eating is also known as the “100 Mile Diet”.   If you would like to be a locavore and focus on eating only the produce our region has to offer, you have a few options. First, it’s likely there is a weekly Farmer’s Market in your town or...

RCFM Members, We have been invited back to the Reebok World Headquarters in Canton, MA to shop at their employee store. This shopping event is a little different than past. It is a one day only event. In celebration of the Nano 6.0 launch on July 7th Reebok is giving our members exclusive access to the store on Thursday July 7th (9am - 7pm) to grab the newest of the Nano family. You will receive 50% off your entire purchase (including the new Nano 6.0s!) as usual! *Please "right click" on the flyer below to download it to your computer.  Then print it out and bring with you to Reebok HQ and present it to the guard at the front gate so they can let you in. *You may share this with your friends and family but *THIS* flyer must not be put on social media or RCFM will not be able to take advantage of this event or future events.  * If you invite ANYONE thats not an RCFM Member they MUST be accompanied by you or another RCFM Member. Happy shopping!    ...

~Written by Rose Colleran~ I’m always on the hunt for new recipes so I subscribe to Cooking Light magazine. I often find some great new recipes to try (Check out my blog for recipe reviews and weekly meal plans). In the June edition I noticed an interesting article regarding determining your “fitness age” and some suggestions on how to turn back the clock. The article directed me to a free quiz on worldfitnesslevel.org to calculate my fitness age. I was curious so I decided to check it out and take the quiz.   My quiz results were pretty amusing. I actually laughed out loud. Apparently I have the fitness level of a 20 year old yet my actual age is 45. Sweet, right?! I don’t put a lot of stock in the results given I was only asked 6 questions, BUT it is an interesting concept.   When it comes to aging, can you turn back the clock or, at the very least, slow it down? I think you can.   I find myself looking more and more at my parents and others around their age and I notice there is a very, very broad spectrum of “fitness age” or quality of life. I don’t know about...

~Written by Rose Colleran~ If you have children, at this time of year you may be fully entrenched in spring sports and dance recitals. Your calendar is likely full of practices and games often inconveniently scheduled at meal times. If this rings true for you and you are struggling with how to handle making sure your child has the appropriate "pre” or "post” practice or game fuel, here are some suggestions for them: First, get them hydrated! Hydration is as important for your little athlete's performance as food is for energy. Dehydration is the number one cause of fatigue. Water is always the best choice for proper hydration. Before – Drink 17-20 oz. of water approximately 1 hour before their activity During – Drink 7-10 oz. of water about every 15 minutes during their activity After – Drink at least 20 oz. of water (A good indication that they have returned to a proper state of hydration is when their urine is a pale yellow color.) Eat a meal (3-4 hours before activity) or snack (30 minutes prior to activity) that is high in “smart” carbohydrates, moderate in protein and low in fat and fiber. Carbohydrates are our body's main fuel source and your selection should ideally be a...

~ Written by Rose Colleran~ When you hear the word “Carbs” or “Carbohydrates”, what do you think of? Do visions of Wonder Bread, donuts, pasta and bagels come to mind? You know, all those things that we have been cautioned against eating in excess, or at all. Well, guess what? All carbs are not created equal! Fruits and vegetables happen to be part of the carbohydrate family too. I like to bucket carbohydrates into two different categories: “Smart Carbs” and “Processed Carbs”. Smart Carbs: These are the plant-based, nutrient dense, whole foods that you know as fruits and vegetables. There are all sorts of great vitamins, phytochemicals and antioxidants in these types of carbohydrates that are not available in the processed variety. Processed Carbs: These are the version of carbs that typically come to mind and that give carbs their bad name (i.e., the white family of bread and pasta). Processed carbs are void of any nutrients that your body can benefit from. These carbohydrates, lacking in fiber, are processed quickly by your body, they drive up your insulin level, and then leave you hungry for more. In addition, many people find that limiting this variety of carbs and increasing the “smart” variety helps...

by Rose Colleran “If you’re interested, you’ll do what’s convenient. If you’re committed, you’ll do whatever it takes.” ~ John Assaraf I recently saw this quote and it’s message really rang true for me due to what I see in my practice and observe in the world around me. “I’m too busy” “It’s too hard” “It takes too long” How often do you hear these or similar statements from people you know? How often do you even find yourself uttering one of these excuses? Activities like exercising regularly or planning (and then eating) healthy meals are frequently dropped from the ‘to-do’ list based on these justifications. The fact of the matter is that it’s simply not easy or convenient to find the time to exercise or plan for healthy eating on a regular basis in our society. There is no question that EVERYONE is busy these days. Yet, some people manage to squeeze in more than others. For example, I have friends who are mothers, work full time and compete in Iron Man Triathlons (events which require 2o hours or more of training per week at the peak of their training programs). Now, these women are amazing, but how did they find (or make) the time, and...

~written by Rose Colleran ~ Last month I decided to abstain from sugar for 30 days (along with approximately 40 other RCFM members). This isn’t the first year I’ve made this commitment. After the super sweet holidays are over I feel like a sugar detox is a great way to kick off the new year. Coincidentally, in early January the federal government released the 2015 – 2020 dietary guidelines. These guidelines are published every 5 years and reflect the current body of nutrition science. Based on many studies and a growing body of evidence about the impact of added sugar on our health, the most recent guidelines recommend a dramatic reduction in sugar consumption. The new recommendation is to limit your added sugar to 10% of your total calories, or approximately 12 teaspoons per day. As a reference, one can of soda has approximately 10 teaspoons. One serving of Minute Maid lemonade is 7 teaspoons. One bottle of Pure Leaf Sweet Tea is 10 teaspoons. Clearly, it’s VERY easy to get to 12 teaspoons without trying too hard. On average, most Americans currently exceed the recommendation by 13 – 17% and many people don’t have a good understanding of what excess is...

written by Rose Colleran How was your Thanksgiving celebration? Does it already seem like a distant memory now that we are in the midst of the holiday chaos?  Can you believe there is only a mere three weeks until the big holiday week! Despite the frenzy of activity, I really enjoy this time of year.  I love the family traditions, music, decorations and celebrations with friends and family. However, like many of you, I also struggle to find a balance between continuing to eat healthy meals and exercise with the consistent barrage of temptations we are seduced by each day and the time crunch resulting from endless to-do lists. For me, it creates a lot of anxiety that can threaten to damper my enthusiasm. So, if you share my desire to maintain balance over the next month, I would like to share some strategies to help you navigate your way. Here are a few suggestions to bear in mind: Don’t Stockpile ~ Any day that you have a party or function, don't skip meals in an attempt to control overall calorie intake for the day. Stockpiling your calories for a big meal at the end of the day rarely works. Instead enjoy a good balance of unprocessed...

written by Rose Colleran “The food you eat builds your body, every day, for better or worse.” ~ Laurie Warren, Warren Wellness I’ve never been a big fan of counting calories. Though I have gone through periods over the last few years where I have tracked my intake to gain a better understanding of my energy balance (the balance of calories consumed through eating and drinking compared to calories burned through physical activity). The process is often very enlightening and can bring a lot of awareness about your eating habits. However, sometimes the process of actually counting calories can lead people to lose sight of the fact that all calories are NOT created equal. Consider these two lists: List A: 100 Calorie Ritz Snack pack 100 Calorie Twinkie Bites pack Pretzel M&Ms Bag of White Cheddar Smartfood List B: 100 Calorie Almond pack and ¼ cup of dried fruit (raisins, apricots, etc.) 1 apple or banana with 1 TBS nut butter ½ cup of cottage cheese or greek yogurt and blueberries 2 TBS hummus and vegetable sticks While comparable in calories, the result of how your body processes and stores List A vs. List B and then fuels your body is completely different. List A is lacking any nutritional value. These items are what...